Two New Clinical Laboratories on the Lowell Campus 4 President Carole Cowan (center), with the help of State Rep. Thomas A. Golden Jr. (center, left), cuts the ribbon to officially open two new clinical laboratories in the Talbot Building on the Lowell campus, as students, faculty and staff look on. In January, Middlesex Community College President Carole Cowan and State Rep. Thomas A. Golden Jr., along with faculty, staff and students, celebrated the opening of two new clinical laboratories in the Talbot Building on the Lowell campus. Assistance Community College and Career Training grant from the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration. “These new labs are among the first projects to be completed through the Transformation Agenda and are an important addition to MCC’s continuing efforts to train the next generation of health care workers,” said Cowan. In conjunction with the new labs, MCC has improved its Academy of Health Professions (AHP) program, adding a variety of traditional and non-traditional courses, smaller class sizes, career counseling and support, and tutoring. The new labs and the restructured program have significantly enhanced career pathways in the fields of health and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) for students at MCC. “The benefit of AHP is students can learn practical, on-the-job skills that can be applied in the workplace right away,” said Kathleen Sweeney, MCC Dean of Health and STEM. “AHP students often get jobs after taking just one course.” “The benefit of AHP is students can learn practical, on-the-job skills that can be applied in the workplace right away.” Kathleen Sweeney MCC Dean of Health and STEM By converting old classrooms into much-needed lab space, MCC has provided students with ample space and the equipment necessary for handson training, enhancing career pathways in health care fields. The project was made possible by a grant from the Massachusetts Community College & Workforce Development Transformation Agenda, an innovative initiative funded by a $20 million Trade Adjustment Profiles 4 Phlebotomy students Neil Desai (left) and Juliet Quinn, both of Lowell, demonstrate on a teaching tool. Golden remarked on the importance of workforce training in today’s economy. “This grant has allowed Middlesex to keep moving people forward. These facilities help get people into classrooms and allow them to get or continue the training they need to get and maintain good jobs.” • Tura Linderholm [ 25 ]