Philosophy and General Humanities Courses



 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

PHILOSOPHY COURSES

 

PHL 101 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3.00

An introductory study of traditional and contemporary philosophies and an analysis of how their ideas apply to living today. Students in the course explore such issues as: the meaning and purpose of life, the nature of religious belief, the justification of moral values, and the meaning of human freedom. Note: This course satisfies the Multicultural or Global Awareness and Written Communication Intensive Value.
Prerequisite: Eligible for ENG 101.

 

ETH 101 ETHICS AND SOCIETY 3.00

An introductory study of traditional and contemporary ethical philosophies and an analysis of how they apply to the chief moral issues of our time. Students in the course explore such moral virtues as courage, compassion and generosity, as well as moral vices like greed, envy, and hypocrisy. Relevant moral issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and our obligation to feed the poor are discussed. Note: This course satisfies the Values or Ethics or Social Policy Intensive Value.
Prerequisite: Placement above or successful completion of ENG 060. Recommendation: Concurrent enrollment in ENG 075 or ENG 085 if CPT reading placement test is between 68 and 75.

 

ETH 102 BUSINESS ETHICS 3.00

An introductory study of traditional and contemporary ethical philosophies and how they apply to contemporary business practices. The course explores such issues as worker’s rights, discrimination, truth in advertising, and the obligation of business to consumers. Note: This course satisfies the Values or Ethics or Social Policy Intensive Value.
Prerequisite: Placement above or successful completion of ENG 060. Recommendation: Concurrent enrollment in ENG 075 or ENG 085 if CPT reading placement test is between 68 and 75.

  

ETH 105 INTRODUCTION TO BIOETHICS 3.00

An introductory study of contemporary issues in bioethics and the ethical theories that serve as a framework for making decisions about those issues.  The topics covered will include: ethical dilemmas in the workplace, professional relationships to patients and experimental subjects, reproductive decision-making, decisions about the end of life, issues in biomedical research, and justice in health care. Appropriate for all students but particularly relevant for students in the Biotechnology and Health Careers programs. Note: This course satisfies the Values or Ethics or Social Policy and Written Communication Intensive Value.
Prerequisite: Placement above or successful completion of ENG 060. Recommendation: Concurrent enrollment in ENG 075 or ENG 085 if CPT reading placement test is between 68 and 75.

 

GENERAL HUMANITIES COURSES:

 

HUM 100
EXPLORATIONS IN HUMANITIES 3.00

This dynamic course will introduce the activities in the Humanities:  music, art, dance, theatre, philosophy, and literature.  The course is hands-on, stresses learning by doing, and will integrate learning strategies, study skills, and information on college resources to help sharpen learning skills that contribute to college success.  This course satisfies the Multicultural/Global Intensive Value.
Prerequisite:  Placement above or successful completion of EN1000 and EN 2101.  Students placing above or who have successfully completed EN 1101 AND whose CPT is above 67 are not eligible to enroll in this course. Recommendation:  Concurrent enrollment in EN 1101 and/or EN 2102, if CPT is between 44 and 55, is encouraged.

 

HUM 101 SEARCHING FOR HEROES 3.00

This course will compare modern day heroes from ancient Greek, Hindu, and Native American mythologies; real-life heroes from the news and biographies; and fictional heroes from literature.  Through reading, writing, and discussing, students will consider how core elements of the heroes’ journey common to all cultures-can inspire and better inform their own college experience, their career choices, and their lives. Note: This course fulfills the SD 1131 Freshman Seminar requirement. Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in two developmental courses.

 

HUM 102 INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES 3.00

A general introduction to the Humanities, music and theatre; the visual and plastic arts (architecture, sculpture, painting, photography, and film); literature and philosophy. Surveys some major works and requires some experiential learning - trips to museums and galleries, musical and dramatic performances.  Although the primary focus is on the Western tradition, some works from other world cultures are included.Note: This course satisfies the Written Communication and Values or Ethics or Social Policy Intensive Value.
Prerequisite: Placement above or successful completion of EN 2103 and completion of EN 1103. Recommendation: Concurrent enrollment in EN 2122 or EN 2131 if CPT reading placement test is between 68 and 75

 

HUM 103 THE GREAT TRADITIONS: AN INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES 3.00

Once upon a time, college was an exploration. These days it is more a high-speed rush towards an occupational goal. Our course is designed to give today’s fast-track students a survey of possibilities, serious and substantial, yet introductory - a brief immersion in the traditional disciplines. Included are Socrates, the Rabbis of the Pirke Avot and Jesus, Freud (in Civilization and its Discontents) and Marx (as introduced by Erich Fromm), the poetry in Leonardo DiCaprio and Clare Danes’ Romeo and Juliet, photography and paintings from the Museum of Modern Art, short fiction by Alice Walker, Bernard Malamud and Higuchi Ichio, and three major statements by 20th Century writers: Virginia Woolf (A Room of One’s Own), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Letter from Birmingham Jail), and Elie Wiesel (Night).

 

HUM 104 MYTHS 3.00

Asks how myths came about and why they exist.  Readings from the Ancient Cultures of Rome, Greece, Egypt and Mesopotamia, as well as an exploration of the myths of the North American Indian and Asian peoples.
Prerequisite: ENG 101

 

HUM 135 WINDOWS ON THE WORLD: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY IN THE HUMANITIES 3.00

This unique course integrates theories of social psychology, humanities and the arts. Research and theories from social psychology are examined in various art forms through novels, biographies, dramas, concerts, etc.  Topics include attitudes, prejudice, biases, conformity, relationships, group dynamics, and environmental setting. Note: This course satisfies the Computer Literacy, Written Communication and Multicultural or Global Awareness Intensive Value.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 101 and either PSY 101 or SOC 101.

Last Modified: 6/10/16