Research on Organizational Skills in Learning



The articles below include some of the most recent research on organizational skills, one of the Core Student Success Skills being promoted by the Strategies for Success program at Middlesex. We encourage faculty and staff to access full text copies of these articles through Middlenet.


Adamson, B., Covic, T., Lincoln, M. (2004). Teaching Time and Organizational Management Skills to First Year Health Science Students Does Training Make a Difference?  Journal of Further and Higher Education, 28(3), 261-276. Retrieved from ERIC database.


The present study reports on new research conducted to determine whether teaching time and organizational skills using a training package can improve these skills. The Abbreviated Time Management Indicator (ATMI) developed by Roberts et al. was used to assess time and organizational management skills. This scale consists of six dimensions, namely sense of purpose, meeting deadlines, mechanics of time management, propensity to plan, coping with temporal flow and effective organization. Participants in this study comprised first year health science students studying at the University of Sydney in their first semester. Four hundred and seventy-eight students participated in a pre-test (baseline) session after which they received information on their individual scores on each of the six dimensions of the scale together with average scores on each dimension for the total group (feedback). Of the original participants 122 completed the post-test session, 5 weeks later. During the intervening period students were given a self-directed training package which provided practical information on how to improve their skills on each of the dimensions contained in the scale. The results of the study indicated no significant improvement in time and organizational management skills. Possible reasons for the lack of improvement are discussed in terms of recent developments in teaching and learning contexts, together with suggestions for future research.

Adamson, B., Covic, T., Lincoln, M. (2004). Teaching Time and Organizational Management Skills to First Year Health Science Students Does Training Make a Difference?  Journal of Further and Higher Education, 28(3), 261-276. Retrieved from ERIC database.

The present study reports on new research conducted to determine whether teaching time and organizational skills using a training package can improve these skills. The Abbreviated  Time Management Indicator (ATMI) developed by Roberts et al. was used to assess time and organizational management skills. This scale consists of six dimensions, namely sense of purpose, meeting deadlines, mechanics of time management, propensity to plan, coping with temporal flow and effective organization. Participants in this study comprised first year health science students studying at the University of Sydney in their first semester. Four hundred and seventy-eight students participated in a pre-test (baseline) session after which
they received information on their individual scores on each of the six dimensions of the scale together with average scores on each dimension for the total group (feedback). Of the original participants 122 completed the post-test session, 5 weeks later. During the intervening period students were given a self-directed training package which provided practical information on how to improve their skills on each of the dimensions contained in the scale. The results of the study indicated no significant improvement in time and organizational management skills. Possible reasons for the lack of improvement are discussed in terms of recent developments in teaching and learning contexts, together with suggestions for future research.


Anday-Porter, S., Henne, K., Horan, S. (2000, May 1). Improving Student Organizational Skills through the Use of Organizational Skills in the Curriculum. Retrieved from ERIC database.

This report describes a program for improving student organizational skills. The targeted population consisted of a fourth-grade self contained class, a sixth-grade science class, and a high school nine through twelve learning disability class in an elementary, middle, and high school setting. The schools were located in middle to upper class suburban
communities in the Midwest. The deficiencies in organizational skills were documented with student, parent, and teacher surveys, and an organizational checklist. Analysis of probable causes indicated that many students of all ages lack organizational skills due to developmental factors, school structure, and parent involvement. The deficiencies of organizational skills adversely affected various situations, including student success. A review of the solution strategies suggested by other researchers, combined with an analysis of the problem setting, resulted in teaching students, time management skills, prioritizing, homework, study skills, organizing student materials in a desk, locker, backpack or trapper, and keeping an assignment notebook. (Contains 26 references and 11 tables of data. Appendixes contain 3 survey instruments and a semantic web.)

Simmons, M. (2006). Effective Study Skills for Post-Secondary Education. College Quarterly, 9(2), Retrieved from ERIC database.

Most instructors and administrators will refer to a student's lack of study and
organizational skills to explain why so many freshmen students drop out or fail to continue with their educational goals. Often students graduate high schools without having to vigorously study and apply themselves in order to pass. As a result, many students enter post secondary education with a severe lack of knowledge and ability to study and learn effectively. Considering that population of non-traditional students has and is still growing on the post-secondary level, an Effective Study Skills class or program is needed on the college level. The survey was conducted by electronic email to all Itawamba Community College students on the Fulton, Mississippi campus (residential) and Tupelo, Mississippi (city commuter campus). The total student population of Itawamba Community College is approximately 3,000 full time students. Itawamba is an institute that offers two year associates degrees in most technical, vocational, and health related fields; as well as, pre-four year degrees in liberal arts, business, and health related fields. Of the 254 students answering the survey, 10 students identified themselves as having special needs and receiving services through the Office of Supportive and Disability Services, OSDS. OSDS has approximately 60 to 75 students each semester that register with the office and request and receive special accommodations. Itawamba Community College has implemented a class to try to address the needs of students and their need for instruction on improving study skills and techniques. The class is a reading improvement and essential skills class that will emphasize study skills, note taking, test taking techniques, and reading for information.

Last Modified: 8/5/12