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Profiles
Literature
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The Write Stuff Revitalizing Writing, Literature & Teaching
Under the direction of Chairwoman Cathy McCarron, the English Department
is responding to growing student interest in literature and creative writing.
arts
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humanities
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mcc
W
hile some may think creative writing and literature are bound
for extinction in today's 140-character-obsessed world, at
Middlesex, writing and literature courses are in high demand.
"There is a growing interest in the English field, and we want to help
students reach their goals, whether that be transferring to a four-year
institution, getting published, or simply enjoying reading and writing,"
said Cathy McCarron, English Department Chairwoman.
The English Department is undergoing a transformation, having
recently hired five new faculty members and developed two new degree
concentrations one in Creative Writing and another in Literature.
"Technology has revitalized the way we teach.
But by integrating technology and hands-on
experience, we are able to take a more diverse
approach to teaching (literature and writing)
at Middlesex that helps free students creatively
and helps them develop a deeper and more
meaningful understanding of the content."
Cathy McCarron
English Department Chairwoman
"Bringing in new people with new ideas, and combining them with the
quality full- and part-time faculty already on board, have allowed us to
expand our offerings for students," said McCarron.
Among new courses are "Reading & Writing Fiction," "Reading &
Writing Poetry," "African-American Literature," "Creative Writing
Entrepreneurship" and "Creative Writing & Publishing." In addition
to these electives, a team of faculty is currently revising the "English
Composition II" course to fulfill the Multi-Cultural/Global Institutional
Student Learning Outcome (ISLO).
"The end goal is to offer a core course that allows
students to engage with texts representing a broad range of perspectives
so they can get a glimpse of other cultures, as well as a reflection of
themselves in the literature they are introduced to," said McCarron.
"In English courses across the spectrum, from developmental reading
and writing, through the capstone level, we want our students to read
and write more critically, to increase their problem-solving skills, and
prepare them for a successful academic and professional future."
McCarron notes that the expansion of technology-enhanced and fully
online English courses is requiring students to write more and more
writing typically results in better writing. But it's not just technology
that helps students learn, she said.
Many English classes integrate hands-on experience into the
curriculum. Several MCC faculty bring published authors into the
classroom to discuss writing with students. And, similarly, teachers often
send students into the community to experience literature by attending
readings, theater productions, or volunteering at local book festivals.
"Technology has revitalized the way we teach," said McCarron. "But by
integrating technology and hands-on experience, we are able to take a
more diverse approach to teaching at Middlesex that helps free students
creatively and helps them develop a deeper and more meaningful
understanding of the content."
Tura Linderholm